Some thoughts on balancing family and a startup

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One of the more taboo topics in “Startupland” is around having a family while starting a business.  When I was about to have my first child while working on my company LaunchBit, I was catching up with a friend of mine who was also an angel investor in my business.

And then he asked me, “How do you think about balancing your company with a young child?”

Since then, it’s a question I’ve batted around for years.  Is this an appropriate question?  Is it even a good question?  And what is even an answer to this question?

To be clear, my friend didn’t mean any malice by it nor was he trying to use my answer as a piece of information in making a decision about investing — he was already an investor. He was just legitimately curious. But of course, the immediate counter question that comes to mind (and that I articulated out loud) is, “Would you have asked me that question if I were a male founder / CEO?”

We all know that he wouldn’t have.

For as long as I’ve been running my own company — first at LaunchBit and now at Hustle Fund — I have not often engaged in conversations about family in business meetings / business settings.  When other people talk about their kids, I usually just kinda smile and nod.  In contrast, my business partner at Hustle Fund Eric often talks about his family and his minivan.  He shares photos of his children with our investors in our monthly reports regularly.  I don’t think think most of our investors even know that I have children.  There is an unspoken looming fear that many female entrepreneurs with children have — that their abilities and dedication as a professional will be judged and looked down upon because they have children.  This is because there is a notion held by some people in the ecosystem that having a startup while having children puts you at a disadvantage and shows a lack of dedication.  Obviously, not everyone holds this belief, but there is no upside as a woman to sharing that you have children while running a startup.  And so for so long, I’ve just generally kept quiet / private about the whole matter.

And I’m not the only woman to do this.  Countless female founders of mine over the years have asked me for advice and guidance on managing a family while starting a company but have also asked me to keep these questions on the down low or even their plans to start a family on the down low.  I’ve become a confidante of sorts because I’m a female founder with a family in this taboo world.

However, after mulling on this for a few years, I think the exact opposite needs to happen.  Everyone would benefit by sharing advice on tips for handling parenting while running a startup.  And, so I’ve decided to write this post on how I’ve managed to balance parenting while running 2 startups (had kid #1 while running a product startup and had kid #2 while starting a VC fund a couple years ago).  

Before I had kids, I had in my mind an idyllic notion of parenting.  I thought I would swaddle my newborn in cloth diapers, feed breast milk for a year, and follow every other piece of advice from “ideal mother” websites. But then, reality quickly set in – in having my first child while running my adtech company.  The idea of spending an extra 30s putting on a cloth diaper at 2 in the morning in a half dazed stage all of a sudden seemed less exciting — my stance on parenting immediately changed when I became a parent — I just wanted to make sure my kid stayed alive and healthy! 

The reality check

On one hand, there is truth to why running a startup and raising children isn’t easy.  Many people will say that it’s because children take up a lot of time and attention.  Other people say it’s because they increase your financial burden. Both are true but IMO not the biggest issues namely because people are incredibly resilient to constraints — both time and money constraints.

For example, before I had children, I thought I was quite efficient with my time. Post-children, in looking back, I’m actually 3x+ more efficient with time now. I never thought I could eke out so much more efficiency. You can ALWAYS become more efficient with more constraints.

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Playing Bejeweled is something I used to do but don’t anymore…

So, the biggest challenge isn’t additional constraints, because resilient people make things work and make them work better.  I actually think the biggest challenge is that there are just a lot more variables that are out of your control.

For example, your kid gets sick and can’t go to school; that’s out of your control. Your kid wakes up every two hours; you can’t control that either. So how do you deal with last-minute situations? How do you impromptu handle situations you didn’t expect? 

So, here are some key things I’ve learned while leveraging my time as an entrepreneur parent:

  1. You need support. Don’t do it alone.
  2. You need to say no and leverage time.
  3. You need to “let go.” 

Support

It really does take a village to raise children, and I’ve leaned on tons of people for support from the beginning through now. I think people are often afraid to do so, but I think it makes life a lot easier. 

During the first few weeks of motherhood, folks showed up with home cooked food or bought meals / meal gift certificates for me and my husband. Beyond the warmth of love and generosity this brought us, such a little act made a big, practical difference in my day. I could then put my energy towards thinking about my business, focusing on my kid, and even some personal recovery time, instead of worrying about what we were going to eat for dinner. On the flip side, this is probably the easiest, best gift you can get a new parent — meals.

My support network helped me balance time as I became a first and then later second time mom while being an entrepreneur. When my kids were still very young, friends and relatives babysat while I went to networking events, to work, or to sleep when I desperately needed a nap. For example, when I was fundraising for Hustle Fund in 2017, there was a networking event on a Saturday in San Francisco, and my husband was out of town.  For the 2-3 hours that I was there, I left my baby with my friends who lived in the Mission.  As an entrepreneur, at work, you ask for the moon from your business partners and potential clients all the time.  But we don’t often do that with people we’re closest with.  Why not?

My husband holds down the fort a lot, especially when I travel for work or have late meetings or events.  And my parents have spent so much time with my kids when they have no school (and in the very beginning when they couldn’t go to daycare), I can’t imagine accomplishing both startups without them or my extended support network.

Pride is one thing you really can’t afford when launching into the role of a entrepreneur-parent. 

Saying no & leveraging time

As a parent and entrepreneur, I need to leverage my time, and I need as much of my 9am-5pm working block to be free to think / write.

To achieve this, unfortunately, this means I end up saying “no” to a lot and moving things to more efficient channels whenever I can.

For example, people ask other people for coffee meetings a LOT!  Usually without any purpose. I used to do these coffee meetings a lot in my 20s. But, now, I often say “no” to coffee meetings. Critics of this strategy may argue, “Well, I’ve built my best connections through coffee meetings.” And I can agree coffee meetings are great to a) re-build or strengthen rapport with someone you already know / want to catch up with a friend OR b) meet with someone new and build rapport with LOTs of coffee meetings with him/her.  But when I look back, the vast majority of my coffee meetings in my 20s have been one and done, and for those people, that one coffee meeting isn’t enough to end up doing business or hang out socially in most cases.  (there are some exceptions but largely true of the coffee meetings I’ve done over the years) 

Instead, I prefer to stick with email for quick communication and if necessary, move to a phone meeting while commuting. In fact, I set up my Calendly so that bookable times are primarily during my commute at the beginning and end of the day. I end up having a lot of meetings while walking, skateboarding, kick scootering or driving. 

For further “networking”, in lieu of a 1:1 coffee meeting, I like to do group drinks / lunch or hangouts outside of my 9-5 working block.  So if there are a handful of people you want to re-build rapport with or want to get to know, it’s a lot more efficient to group everyone together.  And they’re busy too, so they want to make the most of their limited time too.

This means that when I get to work at 9:00am, I’ve already done a few calls / networking, so most of my 9-5pm day is slated for “thinking work”. I might have a couple of additional meetings during that block where I need to take notes and be fully thoughtful, but I like to have — as much as possible — a whole day to only do thinking and writing work.

The opposite of this schedule is what I had when I was working at Google in my 20s. I had back-to-back meetings all day, and then when I got home, I would, in a tired way, try to think and write. In retrospect, if I were to set up my schedule all over again, I would have skipped many of those meetings, asked people to do most work / coordination over email, and done calls while commuting to free up most of the day.

Exercise

As an aside, exercise is really important to me, and combining work time with exercise (walking, jogging, skateboarding, kick-scootering, etc.) allows me to eke out additional productivity.  I don’t believe in multitasking for most things – I think multitasking makes it challenging to really focus and be present. But I do think that exercise and talking-work goes well together, and this type of multitasking actually is more productive. 

I read Christopher McDougall’s Born to Run (excellent book) and learned that our ancestors used to hunt animals by basically jogging a marathon everyday! Since then, I’ve been trying to increase my miles–some days I walk eight miles–and multitasking with phone meetings helps with this goal, too. I’ve also heard that walking is more conducive to thinking than sitting — but who knows?

In addition, I often use voice-to-type to “write” emails on my phone, especially during commutes. Whether walking, jogging, or scootering with my kids, I can still “talk” to do writing work.

Emails

Lastly, everyone gets TONs of email these days, and email management is a big chunk of work in itself.  It’s really important to me to keep my 9am-5pm working block mostly free — I don’t want to be spending most of that time in email.  With the exception of a few emails that need immediate response, I work on email on the Caltrain on the days that I go up to San Francisco or at night after dinner.

I also recommend SaneBox, Superhuman, and Gmail smart responses to streamline emails and Calendly to streamline calls.

I use SaneBox to filter a lot of emails including subscription emails, emails from people I’ve never met, etc.

I use Superhuman for templated responses so that I can tell everyone the same thing over and over again.  For example, if I need to move a conversation to a call, I send the same templated response with just a couple of keystrokes, and people can pick their own time to chat (during commute hours) through my Calendly calendar management.  I also use Superhuman for offline email processing – so for example, if I’m commuting on the Caltrain to San Francisco, I can plough through all my emails offline quickly.

Re-scope responsibilities and letting go

Outside of work, the time it takes to complete simple chores adds up and eats away time and energy you could be spending either working or with your kids. Since working on a startup means having a budget, my husband and I have re-scoped and re-prioritized our chores to make them as manageable as possible.

Laundry. To save time, we don’t fold laundry. We just don’t. I know – that sounds blasphemous. That’s a tradeoff that we’ve made. We each have a laundry basket to keep clean clothes separate, and we wash each person’s laundry in their own load. I also streamline my clothing options by wearing a @HustleFundVC shirt and jeans almost every weekday. I understand that not everyone wants to keep his/her clothes in a laundry basket or wear the same outfit over and over, but I can tell you that it saves me a lot of time. Sometimes you just have to let go and figure out what is really important to you. 

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Photo credit: Giphy

Food. Each week, my husband and I each cook one simple dish, usually on the weekend. One night, we’ll order cheap delivery, one night we’ll end up eating at someone’s house, and one night we’ll pop a frozen pizza in the oven. Leftovers carry us through the rest of the week. Keeping our meals simple means neither of us has to fret over grocery store runs or recipes.

Dropoff and pickup of kids. We only have one car, so we each take a day to do both dropoffs and pickups.  We are fortunate to have managed to get their schools to be close to our work and home, so our commute, in general, is not that long.  (A miracle in the Bay Area where there is tons of traffic) . 

When my kids are not in the car, this is when I do my car calls so that the drive time is not wasted.  When the kids are in the car, it’s actually a good time to chat with our kids.  Conversations don’t just have to be at home at the dinner table.  They can be in the car too.  Since we only have one car, on other days, I will sometimes combine exercise while the kids are in a double stroller or while we’re kick-scootering together and will take calls when the stroller is empty. 

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Double stroller + skateboard combination day

Contractors. People have often asked me if I have a nanny or if I hire a company to clean our place. I’m not averse to this, and in general, I believe in comparative advantage.  Meaning  — if someone else is way better than you at something, for the right price, you should hire help.  This is how you’d run your business; and, this is how you should run your home.

In our case, both of my kids go to school, so a full-time or even part-time nanny wouldn’t be helpful because he/she would have no children to watch during the day. And by setting up the above the systems, things like laundry actually don’t take more than a few minutes — a chore that could take hours you can shortcut by basically not caring.  So should I pay someone for something that I fundamentally don’t care about is the question? Not sure.

I also make my kids — as young as they are (both under 6) — do chores.  In the beginning, it’s not done well, but at this point, they are actually quite good at cleaning and feeding themselves.

But I do think you should pay for things that you do care a lot about and will take a long time (such as this blog post!). That’s how you can get further leverage on your time.

To summarize

Running a business and being a parent each requires a lot more juggling than without children. But, it also forces you to be pretty dam* efficient that you could possibly imagine.  

To summarize, the biggest way to leverage time with a low budget is to a) ask for help from your community (family, friends, and even your own kids); b) prioritize thinking work and figure out how to get rid of everything else; combine with exercise, and c) reduce how much you care about daily chores. 

My business partner Eric at Hustle Fund is appalled by the fact that I don’t fold my clothes, so these exact strategies are not for everyone, but I do think with some creative juggling, you can eke out a lot of additional efficiencies to make parenting and entrepreneurship work without going crazy. 

Special thanks to my editor Caitlin for pulling the first draft of this together.  Also, the stock photo above isn’t a photo of my kids, but they are cute. 

4 comments
  1. Thank you so much for writing this!

    I was recently very discouraged by an article I read where a woman in VC listed down her schedule for the week from 8am to 9pm. She mentioned her child twice in the entire article – once where she said she had one, and another where she said he wasn’t sleeping – but nowhere in her schedule was actually interacting with her child. The article was informative in a technical way, but lacked the detailed real information a lot of us trying to juggle life with career are looking for.

    The more honesty and candidness about having children while being a successful startup founder/owner/funder can only benefit us all. So thank you again for writing this article and helping us all start this conversation.

    1. Thank you for reading and your feedback, Sasha! Can you elaborate on what you mean by “real information” on juggling life and career? (I thought I had written about things I do in my life and career – hah 🙂 ) What would be helpful?

      1. Your article was perfect – filled with all the “real information” people are looking for. The articles I don’t find that helpful are like the one I read that was discouraging, it glossed over or hid any of the actual “life”, sorry if that was confusing. Overall, people are looking for the realness you provided and I thank you again for sharing it.

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